John Visits the UK


 

Recently John McCormack visited galleries which hold his work! Here are a few images from his trip as well as a little background information on him!

 

My career at LEGO spanned many genres, all pithing the creative field. I learned of a job for a graphic designer through an ad placed in the newspaper! I didn’t get the first job I applied for, but I got a call back a mere three weeks later for another design job.

 



Back at the turn of the century, I was responsible for U.S. based retail initiatives. That could be anything from designing gigantic, half a street block long posters to be displayed in Toys R Us in Times Square, to making a sticker that said “sale, $19.99.” 

For a short while, I was responsible for making visual assets to support LEGOland. That included designing interactive play concepts for Bionicle, all the way to stickers that said, “sale, $19.99.”

 



Shortly thereafter, I was assigned to take on developing the LEGO Club Magazine. It was the largest international children’s magazine in circulation, and it was a thrill putting it all together. LEGO was starting to grow at a wild pace back then, and any idea we could think of became a reality. It was truly a magical time to be employed there, as creativity, and ways to connect with kids were celebrated.



As the growth started, so did the need for development on new product lines. My boss and I would literally fly to the main office in Billund, Denmark, and go from desk to desk asking if anyone needed creative help. This sales technique worked, and we started bringing in the revered international development work back to our office in Enfield, Connecticut. We would get assigned projects that the big agencies couldn’t crack the code on. Go look up Galidor. We cut our teeth on that forgotten line, and our ability to adapt and create on the fly opened the door for us. That led to Bionicle, Star Wars, and Harry Potter. My team became known as the quick turn problem solvers, and we would fly to Denmark and develop marketing campaigns in a week. Granted, we would work until 4 am, then be back for meetings to present our work at 8 am, but anything is possible when you are 30 years young.